All posts by christine

Dreaming of Treehouses

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I woke up this morning dreaming of treehouses.

Air B’nB treehouses.

It will be a while until this dream is realized, but I’m envisioning a 1-2-3 punch…

  1. Get together the funds to bring down the enormous old cottonwood back behind The Cottage (it’s over 100 years old and it is dying – we have been crossing our fingers every time a major storm blows through that it won’t bite the big one.
  2. Use that wood to create a treehouse cabin in the “bee tree” (a maple tree we used to have the beehives sitting next to. Note: We no longer have beehives.)
  3. Air Bnb it, complete with a concrete parking pad in the back of the last lot we purchased. It will be accessed via the alleyway. The cabin itself will only be habitable in the spring, summer and fall. I doubt we could make it work during the winter (too icy and too cold).

There is a guy who builds treehouses and he is here in Kansas City! I sent an email to him and I’m hoping he will contact me back soon.

And when we don’t have AirBnB guests it will make a fantastic crash pad for the kiddo and her friends. They will have a GREAT time in it!

Meanwhile, if you are dying to stay in a treehouse AirBnB – check out these fun destinations: Top 20 Treehouses on AirBnB

In Other News

That’s kind of a teaser because all I’m going to say is, there are other news and developments that I will be at liberty to talk about soon, but not now.

Suffice it to say, while work is not progressing at this moment on The Cottage, it will be soon. And there’s more…that I will be at liberty to discuss in mid-July.

Renovations take time and we are in this for the long haul. We have learned a lot – about who to trust, and who to not trust. What questions we should have asked and so much more. It has been a learning experience. So even if you don’t see any progress or wonder if The Cottage will EVER be done, believe me when I say, “I have a plan.”

Keep checking in, things will be a’changing soon!

Graffiti Can’t Stop Me

A couple of weeks ago, while out and about, a neighbor contacted me on Facebook.

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And I came home to this…

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This was disheartening to say the least. Taggers tend to hit buildings that they think no one cares about.

Nevertheless, we had it cleaned up within 24 hours. And along the way, I decided that what needed to happen was MORE.

More signs that this property was being tended to, more evidence of daily involvement. More flowers. More color. More presence.

Taggers tend to hit buildings that they think no one cares about. And we care about this building just as much as the house we currently live in.

So I took a friend’s suggestion and painted the porch the same color as the house…

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And…

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and…

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And wow, I love the look of the green floorboards and more. It pulls the porch into the house and connects it all.

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But it is time to take it further. Stay tuned for an art project in the works, but also I’ve dialed up the barrage of plant transplants and wildflower seeds. I also added these hanging planters…

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I also have begun laying the bricks for a path that will cross into the rest of the properties and eventually diverge into a meandering path of flowering mini-gardens and natural pond. Those mini gardens and the pond are 1-4 years away, but I have the idea of them in my head now, and slowly (1-3 mini garden projects per year) they will be realized.

The Cottage is now outfitted with security lights and a burglar alarm and monitoring. This will act as a further deterrent to any ne’er do wells.

As for that art project?

Stay tuned!

Show Me Those Windows!

The front window
The front window – all wrapped. Yes, we have a little bit of brick repair to still do. We will tuckpoint, replace the brick and mortar it in place, and then do some spot painting.

 

Our original install date was set for November 30th, 2016. At the time we scheduled it, Window World asked, “If we have an earlier appointment opportunity, would you like it?”

Absolutely!

And when they called on November 10th and asked if I would like them to reschedule the installation to the 11th, I jumped at the chance. Windows installed earlier than expected? That sounded great to me!

And at 10:30, they arrived, their truck full of windows.

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Seeing them there, waiting to be unwrapped and installed was exciting. In some ways, it feels as if we have made so little progress on The Cottage, even though we have spent hundreds of hours there. Progress is often done at a crawl.

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Until you have huge leaps forward, like the painting and the windows.

The back porch ready for the new windows
The back porch ready for the new windows

 

These big leaps forward give us juice to move forward on the smaller, no-so-obvious things like wiring, plumbing, insulation and more.

Jay's wife Michelle came out to help with some of the painting we hadn't been able to finish last weekend.
Jay’s wife Michelle came out to help with some of the painting we hadn’t been able to finish last weekend.

 

The windows guys got to work pulling out the old windows. The two windows in the center of the photo above were going to be made into one single window. It saved us a couple of hundred dollars by just having it be one window instead of two.

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The windows came with an aluminum wrap which would cover the wood surrounding the window. This meant we would spend less time having to maintain the paint or the wood and hopefully not have to worry about wood rot or leaks.

A few from the inside. The only windows that were not replaced were the casement windows. One on the west side and two on the east side of the house.
A few from the inside. The only windows that were not replaced were the casement windows. One on the west side and two on the east side of the house.

 

Stepping back and looking at everything, I have to acknowledge, in the past three months there has been an extraordinary amount of work done on this house!

I decided on a long casement window on the back porch. The view is filled with a tree and gives a forest-like feel to the room. I'm busy hatching design plans for this room.
I decided on a long casement window on the back porch. The view is filled with a tree and gives a forest-like feel to the room. I’m busy hatching design plans for this room.

 

Here you can see the exposed wood frame of the house. This will be covered with vinyl siding very soon.
Here you can see the exposed wood frame of the house. This will be covered with vinyl siding very soon. And of course, we will finish the painting of the porch as well.

 

City codes had gotten us on missing windows (they had been shot out around New Year's Eve). I can see that we still need one more coat of paint on everything to make it look good - along with a couple of repairs.
City codes had gotten us on missing windows (they had been shot out around New Year’s Eve). I can see that we still need one more coat of paint on everything to make it look good – along with a couple of repairs.

 

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Progress! And just for perspective, this is how the side of the house looked when we first bought it…

Trees were growing along the foundation and up the roof.
Trees were growing along the foundation and up the roof.

 

What do you think?!

Porches, Paint and More

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The front porch in this 1940 photo is identical to the sagging, warped, and listing one that we ended up removing. If it was original to the house, it was close to 100 years old. It had a good run, but it was time for something new!

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For a couple of weeks we got by with a gangplank as Jay figured out just where the posts would go, dug the holes, and built the framework. Now that the floor is on, she will be working on the columns and railing. We are envisioning a Craftsman-like feel and appearance.

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And the first weekend in November had us hosting a painting party. We knew the weather wouldn’t hold forever and we were desperate to get some help painting the house so that it didn’t continue to get code violations from the city for peeling paint.

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The new color turned a plain white house into something rather spectacular…

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I was amazed at how many people saw it and said, “That is a gorgeous color!”

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We still had some painting left at the end of the day, but wow, we could not have done it without help. Thanks to some rather awesome friends and family, we were able to knock this out and give this old girl a real facelift.

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The day after the painting party, I found myself gravitating towards the back of The Cottage. A sharp incline has made accessing the back of The Cottage difficult and sometimes rather dangerous. The day before, a neighbor had come by and reminded me that she had some concrete blocks if I still wanted them.

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I walked them over six at a time in our wheelbarrow and began to cut into the hillside with my shovel. Between the shovel and a level, I was able to place the concrete blocks into place.

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In six months to a year, I will return to it, lay down some pea gravel and sand and re-seat them. For now, they will help shape the earth, making my job easier next year.

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I also planted a few iris. The plan is to absolutely FILL the hillside with perennial iris, daylilies, tulips and more. They will help control erosion and provide a profusion of blooms from early spring to late fall.

Demo This!

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I fought it, I really did. I liked the solid feel of lath and plaster and it seemed like such a huge job to pull it all out. And how would we dispose of it? The argument lasted for over a year before I finally capitulated. My husband Dave had made his case. We needed to:

  • Install all new electric wiring
  • Install new plumbing
  • Re-engineer HVAC to modern standards
  • Insulate all walls

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The plaster had to go.

And so I set the date. My daughter Em would be gone for two weeks visiting family in San Francisco. It was the perfect time for me to focus on demo’ing as much of the inside of The Cottage as I could.

The first three or four days was all me – Dave was working his new job – Dee (my eldest) was busy prepping for her first semester at UMKC. It got dirty, messy and cluttered real quick.

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We went back and forth about renting a dumpster. The prices were coming in at around $500 for one to be delivered and then picked up later. The problem with having a dumpster is that, once folks in the area know you have a dumpster, they are more than happy to help you fill it up!

I was afraid that we would rent it, turn around twice, and have a dumpster filled with other folks’ trash.

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Our neighbors offered to loan us their pickup truck and we gratefully accepted.

A pickup load, depending on how full we got it, and what all we were putting into it, cost anywhere from $25-$45 to dump. On a Saturday, with three of us working as fast as we could, we could manage to load, move, and dump three loads before the place shut down at noon.

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Over the next two months, we would make around 20 trips to the dump. All in all, it cost us slightly more than the rental and dump fee of one dumpster would have cost. Even if we didn’t have to compete with neighbors to load up the dumpster, we had over 12 tons of lath, plaster, and other debris that we removed from The Cottage.

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Once we were done, all the walls, and even the ceilings, were plaster and lath-free. The floors were cleared and the house was as empty as we could make it.

It was now time to turn our sights to other tasks. Wiring, the plumbing rough-in, and the front porch were next on the list.

 

 

 

Congratulations! You Bought a House for $25!

Did we really pay $25 for The Cottage?

Yes, we did. That’s the short answer.

The long answer is that we promised to fix it up and spend at least $17,000 on it. There were also some fees we had to pay. All in all, we spent $144.50 for the house and the fees necessary to register it in our names.

This is not a normal thing. We just were incredibly lucky. Call it a perfect storm of events:

  • Our home is within eyesight of The Cottage and it is just 25 feet away from the end of our property.
  • My husband is the neighborhood association president, so we were well-known in the neighborhood (this helps since all Land Bank applicants are reviewed and checked to be sure they are in good standing and live in the area)
  • Another neighbor was concerned about a tree in the back of The Cottage and had called Land Bank repeatedly requesting it be cut down. It is an old cottonwood tree that still has plenty of years left in it according to an arborist who checked on it for us.
  • Land Bank, a repository for vacant land and abandoned houses, is overburdened and underfunded. Thanks to urban flight in the 80s and 90s – this area is still underfunded and houses are decaying faster than people can move in and fix them. The economic downturn in 2008 was especially hard on Kansas City and many people suddenly found themselves upside down in their real estate investments. Many simply closed the doors of their houses and walked away.

All of these combined to make it possible for us to offer just $25 on a house and have it accepted.

And now that we were owners of a $25, 900 square foot house, we had to figure out what to do with it.

We began by cutting down some opportunistic trees outside that were a) giving the raccoons easy access to the attic and b) causing significant damage to the roof and foundation. We also needed to take down to trees on the property line in order for KCP&L to be okay with running a new line from the pole to the house.

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Look at those suckers! They were right up against the house, parts of them lying on top of the roof.

We then set about cleaning up the inside of the house. We went through the massive amount of debris and found some amazing discoveries, including two Civil War bayonets, hundreds of 30s and 40s era science magazines, Depression-era glassware, 1910 and 1918 wheat pennies, a Civil War button, an entire set of 1900 Encyclopedia Britannica, and more.

A Civil War button and also a ring made from a silver spoon.
A Civil War button and also a ring made from a silver spoon.
One of the many fun magazines we discovered in the attic
One of the many fun magazines we discovered in the attic

And then there were the lovely hardwood floors beneath the linoleum in the back bedroom, kitchen and hallway.

THREE layers of linoleum over hardwood. The top layer being (laughably) wood look.
THREE layers of linoleum over hardwood. The top layer being (laughably) wood look.

We also dug down, removing the carpet to discover hardwood floors in reasonable condition underneath…

The wood floors were actually in fantastic shape
The wood floors were actually in fantastic shape – they will need a good sanding and then a few coats of poly, but there are no gouges or problems at all.

We found quite a few of the original sci-fi greats, including Lester Del Rey, who later founded Del Rey Books.

For an old book nut like me, this was kind of a dream come true.
For an old book nut like me, this was kind of a dream come true.

With the trees cleared, we were able to install a new electrical box.

Time for a new electrical box!
Time for a new electrical box!

We now had power to The Cottage and had invested around $3,000 total for the box and getting the place cleaned out.

And that’s where we were stalled. We tried getting loans and funding – but there weren’t any to be had. So we were kind of stuck. We didn’t have enough in funds to move forward and we still didn’t have a vision for what we wanted to do with it.

Luckily, houses tend to not complain very much.

Our First Look Inside

Abandoned and unoccupied for more than a decade, here are the photos from our first look inside of The Cottage. At that time, all we knew was that a Nadine Burnworth had been the last resident to live there. After she was taken away to a nursing home sometime in 2003, the house had been boarded up.

Unfortunately, it did not stay that way. Metal scrappers repeatedly broke into it, removing anything of value and leaving a mess behind. The house slowly decayed. Eventually, raccoons, squirrels, and other creatures moved in. It was a mess!

The basement was filled with all kinds of debris - all the way up to our knees in places
The basement was filled with all kinds of debris – all the way up to our knees in places
Up in the kitchen there was a large double sink and metal cabinets above and below
Up in the kitchen there was a large double sink and metal cabinets above and below
And everywhere we stepped there was such a mess!
And everywhere we stepped there was such a mess!
The attic was open to the elements and the raccoons had taken advantage of this during our cold winters.
The attic was open to the elements and the raccoons had taken advantage of this during our cold winters.
The main level didn't look much better and scrappers had stolen the cast iron bathtub and broken the sink and toilet in the bathroom
The main level didn’t look much better and scrappers had stolen the cast iron bathtub and broken the sink and toilet in the bathroom
The house was small - just two bedrooms and it stunk of raccoon.
The house was small – just two bedrooms and it stunk of raccoon.
A large pipe was broken and dribbling water from the roof down into the attic
A large pipe was broken and dribbling water from the roof down into the attic
The ugly carpet was on the top of my list to get rid of.
The ugly carpet was on the top of my list to get rid of.
Outside the back lap siding was missing paint and rotting away.
Outside the back lap siding was missing paint and rotting away in places.

Boy oh boy, we had our work cut out for us.

We thought about it for a month or two. And then we made an offer…